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Big Girls Don't Cry

The Election that Changed Everything for American Women

by Rebecca Traister

Audiobook

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Salon.com reporter Rebecca Traister provides a social commentary on how the 2008 presidential election brought issues concerning women, power, sexism, and feminism to the fore.

In the last two years, the United States—-its history, assumptions, prejudices, and vocabulary—-have all cracked open. A woman won a state presidential primary contest (quite a few of them, actually) for the first time in this country's history. Less than a year later, a vice-presidential candidate concluded her appearance in a national debate and immediately reached for her newborn baby. A few months after that, an African American woman moved into the White House not as an employee but as the First Lady. She is only the third First Lady in American history to have a postgraduate degree, and for most of her marriage, she has out-earned her husband.

In Big Girls Don't Cry, Rebecca Traister, a Salon.com columnist whose election coverage garnered much attention, makes sense of this moment in American history, in which women broke barriers and changed the country's narrative in completely unexpected ways: How did the volatile, exhilarating events of the 2008 election fit together? What lessons can be learned from these great political upheavals about women, politics, and the media?

In an utterly engaging, razor-sharp narrative interlaced with her first-person account of being a young woman navigating this turbulent and exciting time, Traister explores how—-thanks to the campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, and the history-making work and visibility of Michelle Obama, Tina Fey, Rachel Maddow, Katie Couric, and others—-women began to emerge stronger than ever on the national stage.


Expand title description text
Publisher: Tantor Media
Edition: Unabridged

OverDrive Listen audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781400118007
  • File size: 344129 KB
  • Release date: September 14, 2010
  • Duration: 11:55:40

MP3 audiobook

  • ISBN: 9781400118007
  • File size: 344129 KB
  • Release date: September 14, 2010
  • Duration: 11:55:40
  • Number of parts: 13


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1 of 1 copy available

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OverDrive Listen audiobook
MP3 audiobook

subjects

Politics Nonfiction

Languages

English

Salon.com reporter Rebecca Traister provides a social commentary on how the 2008 presidential election brought issues concerning women, power, sexism, and feminism to the fore.

In the last two years, the United States—-its history, assumptions, prejudices, and vocabulary—-have all cracked open. A woman won a state presidential primary contest (quite a few of them, actually) for the first time in this country's history. Less than a year later, a vice-presidential candidate concluded her appearance in a national debate and immediately reached for her newborn baby. A few months after that, an African American woman moved into the White House not as an employee but as the First Lady. She is only the third First Lady in American history to have a postgraduate degree, and for most of her marriage, she has out-earned her husband.

In Big Girls Don't Cry, Rebecca Traister, a Salon.com columnist whose election coverage garnered much attention, makes sense of this moment in American history, in which women broke barriers and changed the country's narrative in completely unexpected ways: How did the volatile, exhilarating events of the 2008 election fit together? What lessons can be learned from these great political upheavals about women, politics, and the media?

In an utterly engaging, razor-sharp narrative interlaced with her first-person account of being a young woman navigating this turbulent and exciting time, Traister explores how—-thanks to the campaigns of Hillary Clinton and Sarah Palin, and the history-making work and visibility of Michelle Obama, Tina Fey, Rachel Maddow, Katie Couric, and others—-women began to emerge stronger than ever on the national stage.


Expand title description text