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National Geographic Magazine

Sep 01 2021
Magazine

Amazing discoveries and experiences await you in every issue of National Geographic magazine. The latest news in science, exploration, and culture will open your eyes to the world’s many wonders.

Pausing to Remember

COLLARS OF CONVICTION • Her robe accessories were just one way Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg stood out on the high court.

THE BACKSTORY • ON ASSIGNMENT AT THE SUPREME COURT, A PHOTOGRAPHER TRIES TO DO JUSTICE TO A JUSTICE’S FASHION TRADEMARK.

The Story of Human Difference • RACE IS A SOCIAL CONSTRUCT, NOT A BIOLOGICAL TRAIT. THAT’S THE SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS—SO WHY DO MANY STILL DOUBT IT?

Biological Differences: Myths Linger

Unfinished work • Historical legacies of race science and eugenics live on in many modern-day institutions. But efforts are under way to reframe the past, correct mistakes, and make science more inclusive.

DISPATCHES FROM THE FRONT LINES OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

FROM A DINO’S WING? • ON THE 160TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DISCOVERY OF THIS FOSSIL IZED FEATHER, SCIENTIST SARE STILL INVESTIGATING THE DINOSAURITA DORNED.

A Magnetic Charge in Its Chomp

BRAVE THE WAVE • In French Polynesia, waves are revered and feared at the legendary surf break off the village of Teahupoo.

PLANET POSSIBLE • Send kids into the school year with eco-friendly ideas for their lunches, supplies, and projects.

RAE WYNN-GRANT

COIFFED LIKE COLONIALS

EATING THE PROBLEM • FROM LIONFISH TO KUDZU, INVASIVE SPECIES—USUALLY DESTRUCTIVE AND DISDAINED—CAN ALSO BE DELICIOUS.

SMALL WONDERS • Modern astronomy is giving us unprecedented views of the tiny objects littering our solar system. These small bodies are yielding clues to the universe’s biggest mysteries.

DUSTY BEGINNINGS • In the wake of our sun’s formation, a cloud of dust and gas was left swirling around the infant star. Gradually these materials began to clump together, forming the beginnings of planets. In the celestial chaos, these objects collided, sometimes forming larger bodies and other times being broken up entirely. Over four billion years later, countless bits of leftover rubble remain trapped in the gravity of our sun and its planets.

MULTITUDES OF MINORS • Leftover fragments of planetary building blocks orbit the sun in the form of asteroids, comets, and dwarf planets. Ranging from pristine to geologically active, these small bodies offer clues to our solar system’s history through their composition, orbit, and behavior.

Cheetahs for Sale • The regal cat is coveted by traffickers who sell wild animals to wealthy buyers. This is how one criminal network has smuggled cubs out of Africa—and how Somaliland is fighting back.

Do you know these animals?

Captive cheetahs through history • Pet cheetahs today are most likely to be found in wealthy Arab households. But they’ve long been the playthings of high society around the world, from ancient Egyptian pharaohs and Genghis Khan to Italy’s Renaissance nobles, such as the Medicis.

TRACKING THE MELT • High in the Andes, a National Geographic team installed a weather station that could help central Chile cope with the drought and warming that threaten its water supply.

AFGHANISTAN’S DANGEROUS DIVIDE • After U.S. troops exit, which Afghanistan will prevail—one that defends FREEDOMS gained since 2001 or one that reverts to OPPRESSION by the Taliban?

EMBATTLED AFGHANISTAN

FIGHTING FOR CONTROL

CENTURIES OF STRIFE

THE COST OF CONFLICT

ECHOES OF LOSS

SACRED DUST

BURIED ALIVE

FORGED IN THE TWIN TOWERS ATTACKS

DEVOTION TO DUTY

VOW TO LIVE

LYNSEY ADDARIO


Expand title description text

subjects

Science

Languages

English

Amazing discoveries and experiences await you in every issue of National Geographic magazine. The latest news in science, exploration, and culture will open your eyes to the world’s many wonders.

Pausing to Remember

COLLARS OF CONVICTION • Her robe accessories were just one way Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg stood out on the high court.

THE BACKSTORY • ON ASSIGNMENT AT THE SUPREME COURT, A PHOTOGRAPHER TRIES TO DO JUSTICE TO A JUSTICE’S FASHION TRADEMARK.

The Story of Human Difference • RACE IS A SOCIAL CONSTRUCT, NOT A BIOLOGICAL TRAIT. THAT’S THE SCIENTIFIC CONSENSUS—SO WHY DO MANY STILL DOUBT IT?

Biological Differences: Myths Linger

Unfinished work • Historical legacies of race science and eugenics live on in many modern-day institutions. But efforts are under way to reframe the past, correct mistakes, and make science more inclusive.

DISPATCHES FROM THE FRONT LINES OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

FROM A DINO’S WING? • ON THE 160TH ANNIVERSARY OF THE DISCOVERY OF THIS FOSSIL IZED FEATHER, SCIENTIST SARE STILL INVESTIGATING THE DINOSAURITA DORNED.

A Magnetic Charge in Its Chomp

BRAVE THE WAVE • In French Polynesia, waves are revered and feared at the legendary surf break off the village of Teahupoo.

PLANET POSSIBLE • Send kids into the school year with eco-friendly ideas for their lunches, supplies, and projects.

RAE WYNN-GRANT

COIFFED LIKE COLONIALS

EATING THE PROBLEM • FROM LIONFISH TO KUDZU, INVASIVE SPECIES—USUALLY DESTRUCTIVE AND DISDAINED—CAN ALSO BE DELICIOUS.

SMALL WONDERS • Modern astronomy is giving us unprecedented views of the tiny objects littering our solar system. These small bodies are yielding clues to the universe’s biggest mysteries.

DUSTY BEGINNINGS • In the wake of our sun’s formation, a cloud of dust and gas was left swirling around the infant star. Gradually these materials began to clump together, forming the beginnings of planets. In the celestial chaos, these objects collided, sometimes forming larger bodies and other times being broken up entirely. Over four billion years later, countless bits of leftover rubble remain trapped in the gravity of our sun and its planets.

MULTITUDES OF MINORS • Leftover fragments of planetary building blocks orbit the sun in the form of asteroids, comets, and dwarf planets. Ranging from pristine to geologically active, these small bodies offer clues to our solar system’s history through their composition, orbit, and behavior.

Cheetahs for Sale • The regal cat is coveted by traffickers who sell wild animals to wealthy buyers. This is how one criminal network has smuggled cubs out of Africa—and how Somaliland is fighting back.

Do you know these animals?

Captive cheetahs through history • Pet cheetahs today are most likely to be found in wealthy Arab households. But they’ve long been the playthings of high society around the world, from ancient Egyptian pharaohs and Genghis Khan to Italy’s Renaissance nobles, such as the Medicis.

TRACKING THE MELT • High in the Andes, a National Geographic team installed a weather station that could help central Chile cope with the drought and warming that threaten its water supply.

AFGHANISTAN’S DANGEROUS DIVIDE • After U.S. troops exit, which Afghanistan will prevail—one that defends FREEDOMS gained since 2001 or one that reverts to OPPRESSION by the Taliban?

EMBATTLED AFGHANISTAN

FIGHTING FOR CONTROL

CENTURIES OF STRIFE

THE COST OF CONFLICT

ECHOES OF LOSS

SACRED DUST

BURIED ALIVE

FORGED IN THE TWIN TOWERS ATTACKS

DEVOTION TO DUTY

VOW TO LIVE

LYNSEY ADDARIO


Expand title description text