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New Scientist

Sep 25 2021
Magazine

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Time to look beyond gas • The UK’s crisis shows the folly of a global dash for a supposedly clean fuel

New Scientist

Call for cleaner air • The World Health Organization has strict new air pollution limits, but it remains to be seen if countries adopt them, says Adam Vaughan

How many hospitalisations? • England could soon see up to 7000 covid-19 hospitalisations a day, but that is only one of several different possible scenarios, reports Clare Wilson

Quantum computer helps design a better quantum computer

Cuttlefish seen gathering to migrate and defend others

Woman who first gained sense of smell at 24 reports finding it disturbing

Mushballs in the atmospheres of the ice giants

BepiColombo probe prepares for its first fly-by of Mercury

Fewer eyes on the sky • As space tourism takes off, it is no surprise that we see far less of private trips than we did of the journeys of government astronauts, says Leah Crane

Maps of planet-forming zones will help the hunt for alien life

Catnip chemical from yeast could be mosquito beater

Green energy didn’t cause UK crisis • The UK is facing energy problems as gas prices spike, but the transition to renewables isn’t to blame – in fact it is the solution, says Adam Vaughan

UK skies to be badly affected by satellite mega constellations

New climate plans fall short • The gap between emissions cuts required for 1.5°C and the pledges made by countries has narrowed by 15 per cent, but it remains significant, finds Adam Vaughan

Potential exomoon found orbiting a giant rogue planet

Your cat is comforted by you, not your smell

City-wide quantum network in China is largest yet

Proposed bin tax could help the UK hit net-zero goals

NASA Perseverance rover hit by 100 dust devils on Mars

Big increase in fish demand by 2050 • Brazil, India and Nigeria are among the countries predicted to double their consumption of fish

Fake German TikTok users could spread false election info

AI solves riddle of missing text on ancient clay tablets

HPV infection raises premature birth risk

Ancient spiders were dedicated mothers

Really brief

5-minute test for covid-19 antibodies

Strange new form of parasite lives on corals

Natural way to make water flow uphill

A hard line to walk • Plans to change how medicines are assessed in England and Wales mustn’t weaken safety precautions, says Clare Wilson

Ecological grief • Climate change is taking a huge toll on our mental health, particularly for young people and those on the front line. But it could help us find a way forward, writes Graham Lawton

Heavenly art

Your letters

Here be sandworms • Denis Villeneuve’s overly solemn remake of Dune is heavy on action, but light on fun, argues Davide Abbatescianni

Erupting into life • Weird space volcanoes could tell us a lot about life on Earth and beyond, finds Gege Li

Don’t miss

Travels of the mind • Psychonauts 2 is a worthy successor to the original game from 15 years ago, with plenty of wit, style and imagination and a more sophisticated take on mental health, says Jacob Aron

The great disappearing trick • Black holes eat information – an impossible act that current theories of...


Expand title description text

subjects

Science

Languages

English

New Scientist covers the latest developments in science and technology that will impact your world. New Scientist employs and commissions the best writers in their fields from all over the world. Our editorial team provide cutting-edge news, award-winning features and reports, written in concise and clear language that puts discoveries and advances in the context of everyday life today and in the future.

Elsewhere on New Scientist

Time to look beyond gas • The UK’s crisis shows the folly of a global dash for a supposedly clean fuel

New Scientist

Call for cleaner air • The World Health Organization has strict new air pollution limits, but it remains to be seen if countries adopt them, says Adam Vaughan

How many hospitalisations? • England could soon see up to 7000 covid-19 hospitalisations a day, but that is only one of several different possible scenarios, reports Clare Wilson

Quantum computer helps design a better quantum computer

Cuttlefish seen gathering to migrate and defend others

Woman who first gained sense of smell at 24 reports finding it disturbing

Mushballs in the atmospheres of the ice giants

BepiColombo probe prepares for its first fly-by of Mercury

Fewer eyes on the sky • As space tourism takes off, it is no surprise that we see far less of private trips than we did of the journeys of government astronauts, says Leah Crane

Maps of planet-forming zones will help the hunt for alien life

Catnip chemical from yeast could be mosquito beater

Green energy didn’t cause UK crisis • The UK is facing energy problems as gas prices spike, but the transition to renewables isn’t to blame – in fact it is the solution, says Adam Vaughan

UK skies to be badly affected by satellite mega constellations

New climate plans fall short • The gap between emissions cuts required for 1.5°C and the pledges made by countries has narrowed by 15 per cent, but it remains significant, finds Adam Vaughan

Potential exomoon found orbiting a giant rogue planet

Your cat is comforted by you, not your smell

City-wide quantum network in China is largest yet

Proposed bin tax could help the UK hit net-zero goals

NASA Perseverance rover hit by 100 dust devils on Mars

Big increase in fish demand by 2050 • Brazil, India and Nigeria are among the countries predicted to double their consumption of fish

Fake German TikTok users could spread false election info

AI solves riddle of missing text on ancient clay tablets

HPV infection raises premature birth risk

Ancient spiders were dedicated mothers

Really brief

5-minute test for covid-19 antibodies

Strange new form of parasite lives on corals

Natural way to make water flow uphill

A hard line to walk • Plans to change how medicines are assessed in England and Wales mustn’t weaken safety precautions, says Clare Wilson

Ecological grief • Climate change is taking a huge toll on our mental health, particularly for young people and those on the front line. But it could help us find a way forward, writes Graham Lawton

Heavenly art

Your letters

Here be sandworms • Denis Villeneuve’s overly solemn remake of Dune is heavy on action, but light on fun, argues Davide Abbatescianni

Erupting into life • Weird space volcanoes could tell us a lot about life on Earth and beyond, finds Gege Li

Don’t miss

Travels of the mind • Psychonauts 2 is a worthy successor to the original game from 15 years ago, with plenty of wit, style and imagination and a more sophisticated take on mental health, says Jacob Aron

The great disappearing trick • Black holes eat information – an impossible act that current theories of...


Expand title description text